Our mail goal here at The Kyanite Press is to uplift indie voices. We hope to discover new talent, work with established authors, and create a truly unique and cutting-edge journal. Please check out our contributors and support them by purchasing a copy of The Kyanite Press!

You can find out more about Samantha at pepperwrites.com, and about her series at nothingbutglory.com.
You can also follow Samantha on Twitter.

“For the Greater Good” – Sep/Oct 2018

Samantha Amenn is a freelance writer who lives in Chicago with their spoiled pup. Their story “A War’s Soul” was published in the Yoroiden Samurai Troopers 30th Anniversary Fanzine, their flash fiction “Unquiet Grave” was published in the online magazine, Short Fiction Break and their two speculative stories “Sunday Bloody Sunday” and “Manfred” were published in the Virginia Military Institute’s literary magazine the Sounding Brass. They are currently working on their first speculative novel For the Next Killer Who Dies.

 

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I love writing about revolutionaries and madmen, the kind of people who shape the world. I also love writing about worlds that are on the cusps of great change, where the old rules no longer work, because I think that’s when we truly see what characters are made of.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
The authors that had the biggest impact on me are Ray Bradbury, Alan Moore, Stanislaw Lem, J. R. R. Tolkien, Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, Shirley Jackson, Victor Hugo, Albert Camus, David Mitchell, and Hamid Ismailov. They subverted expectations while providing incisive social commentary, which is what I strive to do.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
I think the message is: stay true to yourself, so the world must accommodate you and not the other way around. Many of my characters are difficult people, but they know who they are, and they refuse to bend to a world that doesn’t want to accept them.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
Speculative fiction interests me because it’s a real-life version of Dorian Gray’s picture. We can try to appear as pristine and charitable as we like, but speculative fiction reveals us as we are-horrific and beautiful. It doesn’t condemn, however, it offers redemption, if people are willing to listen.

Find out more about Chad and read his blog at chaddchristy.com.
He does the Twitter (badly) and the Facebook (very badly).

He shares his interests and visual inspirations on Pinterest.

“Echoing Carcossa” – Halloween 2018

Chad D. Christy is just a guy who likes to write. He’s been a journalist, a retail manager, a dungeon master, a self-defense instructor, and a paramedic. His first story was scrawled in crayon at the age of six. His most recent work, That’s What Neighbors Are For, is a collection of literary short stories. He has also written two novels: the steampunk horror adventure, Through the Blind, and American Fantasy, an adventure set in an arcane post-apocalypse.

He currently lives with his wife and son in Columbus, Ohio.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
If a story has great characters, I’m in. If I don’t care about the characters, I don’t care about the story. I need characters who are relatable, sympathetic, or at least interesting. And they must operate with an intrinsic consistency.

Who are your favorite authors?
First, thank you for not making me pick just one.
Robert A. Heinlein is top of my list, but after him, the line isn’t as smooth. In no particular order there’s H.P. Lovecraft and Robert W; Chambers. Edgar Rice Burroughs and Robert E. Howard; Raymond Carver and James Thurber; and Dashiell Hammett and Mickey Spillane.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work
Individual accountability and active hope. Active hope doesn’t sit waiting for the world to spontaneously get better; it’s a hope that drives forward spreading the light the world needs. Without individual accountability, active hope cannot exist. If we don’t take responsibility for ourselves, and instead blame others for our woes, we can’t even get started.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
The best thing about these stories is how even subtle changes to the nature of reality can direct a reader to examine deeply-rooted, unquestioned conventions. When done right, speculative fiction can ask powerful questions and penetrate the most stubborn minds with grace and precision.

Find out more about Stephen at scoghlan.com.
You can also connect with him on Twitter, Facebook, and Goodreads.

“Targeted” – Sep/Oct 2018

“The Prisoner’s Diary” – Halloween 2018

Hailing from the capital of the Great White North [Canada]Stephen Coghlan spends his days erecting buildings, and his nights reveling in the dreamscape. Since 2017, he has produced a myriad of flash fictions, short stories, novellas and novels, including, but not limited to, the GENMOS Saga, the Nobilis series, and has had his works read on podcasts and featured in anthologies.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Anything, really. I absorb just about any book I can get my grubby fingers on, although I have a penchant for war documentaries and science fiction with cyberpunk themes.

Who are your favorite authors?
Anne McCaffrey, Frank Herbert, Neil Gaiman, J. Michael Straczynski, Garth Enis, Hiroaki Samura, just to name a few

Outside of books, what is your favorite format of storytelling?
I love to tell stories and jokes of experiences to people and watch them react. Verbal word crafting is a dying art.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
The ability to create and showcase your imagination. Each of us see the world in many lights, but only talk of the once society considers “normal.” Spec lit lets us light up all the shadows, or throw them into stark relief.

Find out more about Benjamin at his Website.
Follow him on Twitter and Instagram.
Find his books on Amazon and Goodreads.

“The Rookery at Smeaton Abbey”
– Sep/Oct 2018

Benjamin Hope is the author of Victorian gothic-steampunk crossover, The Procurement of Souls. His sequel, A New Religion, is due for release in 2019 and he is also currently working on a collection of cautionary fairy tales. He blogs regularly on the writing process and offers up recommendations in 60 words for speculative and gothic fiction on his website at www.benjamin-hope.com. He occasionally guest lectures at universities on public speaking and lives in Hertfordshire, in the UK, with his wife and daughter.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I’m a speculative man in the main but I love anything with a dark edge and messages or ideas that simmer below the surface. I love language too so poetic prose are a draw. Then again, I’m always ready to devour a brutal adventure from the likes of Joe Abercrombie.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
Countless authors have influenced (and continue to influence) me on my writing journey but to name a few and the reasons behind them: Edgar Allan Poe for his gothic verve; Joe Abercrombie for his pacing and characters; Susannah Clarke for her world building; and G.W.Dahlquist for his ingenious plots!

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
As The Rookery at Smeaton Abbey suggests, I love exploring fairy-tales, fables, allegories and everything in-between. Yet my newly released full-length debut, The Procurement of Souls, is a gothic-steampunk crossover about bio-alchemists! And this is the unifying factor; the thing that delights me most: story-telling through a gothic lens.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
The thing I love about speculative fiction is that the only limitation is your imagination. There is no end to the creativity it can inspire.

You can find more about Sage at their website www.storiesundermyskin.com.
You can also follow them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr.

“I Love My Town” – Halloween 2018

Sage P. Irwin publishes creepy, strange, and speculative short stories to their website and is working on branching out to wider audiences. They like to ask questions, imagine alternatives, and be scared. They are a queer and non-binary author who strives to normalize and explore the existence of these identities through their work. They hold a degree in English and gender studies from the University of Toronto, work in the nonprofit sector, and do most of their writing from an attic room in the Kawarthas.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I love scary stories, weird stories, and imaginative stories. I enjoy stories with narrators that are personal, reflective, and occasionally a little “off”. I love fiction that closely resembles the world we live in with just one thing out of place.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I write about haunted packages, alien encounters, demons, ghosts, and the end of the world. Currently, I’m working on a story about a journal that affects reality as well as a novella about a person and a gorilla roaming around a post-apocalyptic Vancouver.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
Queer and trans folks exist and we deserve to have our stories told. Gender neutral pronouns are something people should start getting used to. We are also allowed to be more than our identities. Not all of our stories have to revolve around coming out.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
I love the way some speculative fiction explores the dynamics of power and oppression in this world and others. I think SF can make for incredibly effective social commentary, reflecting on the questions raised by philosophy and politics in a creative way.

You can find out more about Eric at ericlahti.com and at his blog.
You can also follow him on Twitter and Facebook.

“Security System” – Halloween 2018

Eric Lahti is a programmer, author, martial artist, and generally decent guy. He writes urban fantasy with a smattering of horror and humor with the odd short story tossed in. He’s the author of the Henchmen series and his ode to Kung Fu Theater: Greetings From Sunny Aluna. His most recent book about devils, ghost hunters, witches, and magic should be available sometime this Fall.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I enjoy stories that make me wonder and sticks with me long after the story is over. I’m not particular to any genre, but I love stories that cover big stuff. Be it Sci-Fi, urban fantasy, or anything else, as long as it leaves something behind, I dig it.

Who are your favorite authors?
I love Richard Matheson’s work.  Tim Powers has done some absolutely amazing work, too. Heinlein, Asimov, Stephenson, Walter Gibson, Lester Dent, Stephen King, Harlan Ellison, Walter Jon Williams.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
Not overly. Some of my books are a reaction to what I see going on in the world, others just have larger themes. They all have the same underlying sense of something magical happening just around the corner. Maybe that’s the message: Keep looking and you might find something amazing.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
Definitely Tim Powers. I love his work and the intricacy that he weaves into his plots.  Some of the bigger names of the 30s pulp world such as Walter Gibson and Lester Dent have also influenced me. Their love of adventure shines through their works.

You can find out more about Arthur at arthurmacabe.com, and you can find him on Twitter.

“The Schlikt” – Halloween 2018

Arthur Macabe is a writer of science fiction, horror, fantasy and the strange. In addition to his writing projects, he conducts weekly interviews with other writers, inspiring others in the pursuit of the craft and discovering new stories.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I love stories which make me think and take me to and fun and unexpected place.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I love to write science fiction and fantasy, as well as non-fiction about engineering and construction practices.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
The Sword of Shannara was one of the first books I read. That feeling I had when I finished the book is the same feeling I hope my readers discover when they read my work.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
There can be a sense of adventure no matter where you are. I also strive for a positive twist in my stories, the primary character discovering a new sense of freedom.

Find Richard at his website,
or follow him on Twitter.

“Shimmering in the Night” – Sep/Oct 2018

“Shadow Men” – Halloween 2018

Richard Mellinger was born and raised in Monterey, Ca. He has a BS and MS in Physics from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and San Diego State, respectively. He writes fiction of all sorts and loves physics, astronomy, writing, photography, and dogs… mostly dogs… all the dogs.

Who are your favorite authors?
Kurt Vonnegut, Christopher Moore, and Stephen King

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I don’t think there are many limits on the things I enjoy writing about. I just write whatever strikes my fancy. Sometimes it’s science fiction or fantasy. Other times it’s horror or literary. If you find a pattern, please let me know!


What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
The little voice inside my head that tells me what to write is a weird love child of all my favorite authors. Though, having read so much Kurt Vonnegut, Christopher Moore, and Stephen King, they tend to be the dominant ingredients.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
I like the freedom to explore and play in a world where I make the rules.

Find out more about Dennis at dennismombauer.com.
You can also follow Dennis on Twitter and Facebook.
Find “Die Novelle” HERE.

“A Passage of Time” – Sep/Oct 2018

Dennis Mombauer, *1984, currently lives in Colombo as a freelance writer of fiction, textual experiments, reviews; and essays on climate change and education.  He also is co-publisher of “Die Novelle–Magazine for Experimentalism”. He has publications in various magazines and anthologies. He published the German novel “Das Maskenhandwerk” (The Mask Trade) with AAVAA press in 2017.

 

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
Very often, my protagonists have crumbling palaces or networks of caverns snaking through their minds, and these places are not always empty. The other theme of my writing is cities, with an interest in their social workings and different strata, in how they function as human colonies and engines of progress.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
The usual suspects, from classics to genre literature. Some huge influences that may be lesser known: Daniel Ableev (my former colleague and an eminent strangeologist, always pushing the boundaries in all directions), Hugh Cook, Mark Z. Danielewski, Thomas Ligotti (the Lovecraft of our time), Jeff Long, Clark Ashton Smith, and Cordwainer Smith.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
For me, writing expresses what I cannot put into words otherwise, and what I might not even be consciously aware of. I would say that there are many different ways to look at the same thing, everybody gets lost, and what is important is to question yourself and try to be better.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
To view the world from a different perspective and to show how things could change. Naturalist fiction often ends up reinforcing the belief that the present state is without alternative. I find it important to have a layer of alienation from reality, a veil of dissociation, a filter through which to view the things that really matter.

You can follow Jennifer on Twitter and Facebook.

“The Storyteller” – Halloween 2018

In third grade, Jennifer Nelson wrote a story about a girl who died to save her best friend. When her teacher’s only response was, “But she died!”, she knew she wanted to be an author. Now, she lives in Pennsylvania with two cats that get a little too involved with the writing process. When she’s not overthinking her urban fantasy stories, she plays video games, cross-stitches, listens to metal, studies tarot, and other contradictory activities.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
Colorful characters, magic, people figuring out how to communicate with each other, dreams


What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
Robin McKinley and Brian Jacque’s Redwall series were HUGE influences during my formative years. I don’t write about talking mice, but Redwall was the first inkling of my love of great characters. As for McKinley, she takes classic fairy tales and expands them, breathes new life into them and makes them her own. Also, though I only discovered Maggie Stiefvater a few months ago, and she’s already becoming a major influence. She tackles so many things, from pastel art to calligraphy to bagpipes and excels at them all because of, as she says, “infinite patience for practice”, and if that’s not inspiring, I don’t know what is.


Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
I’ve asked myself that a lot recently. When I write, I’m telling the story my characters are experiencing, without thought to theme or message until it was there all along. But there is one common message throughout – no matter what limitations you think you might have, be it difficulty with words, with hearing, with staying human, there is always someone out there who hears what you have to say, no matter how silently you say it.


What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
I love things that tickle the imagination, that show me things I’ve never seen or thought of before, that present outlandish ideas and show how they can be real. And now that I’m older, I love seeing what was wondrous as a kid getting all kinds of corrupted and twisted.

“The Thing Inside” – Sep/Oct 2018

“3 Morton Place” – Halloween 2018

Enkelli Arn Robertson is a speculative fiction author who tells the truth by writing lies.  He enjoys spending time in his own worlds, which he sometimes invites others to visit. He is an avid student of military history; which often informs his writing. He is also a tabletop gamer with interest in numerous role playing games and miniature war games.

 

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Hardboiled detective stories, fantasy, military sci-fi, horror, and historical.

Who are your favorite authors?
H.P Lovecraft, J.R.R. Tolkien, Raymond Chandler, and Dashiell Hammett.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I love writing crime fiction. Something about building a mystery and allowing a character to solve it is very satisfying.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
Exploring new worlds and visiting places that I couldn’t visit otherwise.

Follow A.A. Rubin’s writing on the
Movie (P)Review Show

and follow him on Twitter and Facebook.

He is also on Deviant Art!

“Darkness My Old Friend” – Sep/Oct 2018

A. A. Rubin’s fiction has appeared in publication such as Pif Magazine, Serious Flash Fiction, and Scriveners Pen. He was named a Fiction War Finalist for his story The Substance in The Shadow. His graphic novel, Night Prowler: In The Crosshairs is scheduled for released next year. Rubin holds a BA in Writing/Literature from Columbia University and an MA in Teaching of English from Teachers College Columbia University. A mild-mannered writer by day, he wanders the streets at night as a vigilante crime-fighter. He lurks in the shadows, behind the curtain of night, waiting for the proper moment to strike.

 

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
Most of my writing is either really funny or really dark. In addition to SFF, I also write literary fiction and comics. My first graphic novel is scheduled to be released by Golden Bell Studios later this year.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
Tennyson wrote, “I am a part of all who I have met.” All authors, I believe, are influenced by “all who they have read.” My influences include Terry Pratchett, Charles Dickens, Kurt Vonnegut, JRR Tolkien, Frank Miller, Bruce Springsteen, all of the Romantics, Neil Gaiman, Shakespeare, and Franz Kafka.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
Most people face a choice between love and security. Modern society pushes us toward choosing security, to choose the rational over the emotional. My work advocates for the opposite, for the choice of love and the acceptance of truths beyond what we can prove rationally.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
There is a magic in the speculative that allows us to access truths we cannot consider in a purely rational setting. Shakespeare knew this, as did Homer, Emily Bronte, and even Dickens. There is something about SFF that lends itself to the bigger philosophical and moral questions.

Follow Matthew on Twitter and Facebook.
Access exclusive content from Matthew on Patreon!

“Prisoner Zero” – Sep/Oct 2018

Matthew Standiford is a Retired Army Veteran who enjoys writing when he’s not being the Ringmaster to his three children circus. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Creative Writing and English and has also been published in Shotgun Strange Stories. He is also finally working on a novel.

 

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I like to read horror, thrillers, and science fiction. I honestly enjoy all genres but these are the three that will make me interested in a book right away.

Who are your favorite authors?
Stephen King, George R.R. Martin, Thomas Harris, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
S
tephen King’s “Salem’s Lot” is my all-time favorite book and I like how the town and the Marsten House are characters themselves. I read that book in 6th grade and by time I finished it I knew writing was what I wanted to do.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
I like making things up. Anything goes in speculative fiction. You can use the real world or a new made up world as an empty sandbox, and throw whatever you want into it.

You can find Michael on Twitter, Amazon, and Goodreads.

“Hide and Seek” – Halloween 2018

Michael Subjack was born in a small town in Western New York. He enjoys good cigars and going on hikes with his dog Rosie.

Michael currently lives in Los Angeles.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Anything that catches my interest when I’m scrolling through the Kindle Store.

Who are your favorite authors?
Within the last year, I’ve been reading a lot of Joe Hill’s work, as well as Karin Slaughter’s.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
Stephen King, Richard Matheson, H.P. Lovecraft, Shirley Jackson, Michael McDowell, and Rod Serling.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
Life is hard but if you’re one of my protagonists, it’s only going to get worse. Much, much worse.

Find out more about Charlie’s literary competition at Rejectedmanuscripts.org and on Twitter.

“The Social Web” – Sep/Oct 2018

Charlie Taylor is a Canadian who teaches English at universities and high schools in Taiwan, where he lives with his wife, Vicky, and two small children, Jamie and James. He holds Bachelor of Journalism and Master of Education degrees. In his free time he runs a literary competition for previously-rejected manuscripts. He has traveled to almost 60 countries, has hitched over 10,000 rides with strangers, and he once ran for mayor of Ottawa.

 

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I do not have a favorite genre. As a flawed human, I like stories that reinforce my personal worldview. The editor in me likes stories that are spelled correctly and punctuated well. As a father, I cannot read any stories where bad things happen to little children.

Who are your favorite authors?
There are far too many to list here. I just finished reading a translation of a really gripping book called Elegy of Sweet Potatoes by Tehpen Tsai. Some other writers I admire are Tom Robbins, George Orwell, Roald Dahl, Mordecai Richler, Ben Elton, Hunter Thompson, and Stan and Jan Berenstain.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
Ninety percent of what I write is academic non-fiction, so writing fiction is like eating dessert. I enjoy anything that does not require end-notes and citations. I particularly like recording whatever my subconscious has worked up during the night and delivered, more or less fully formed, to my conscious mind.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
I do not have one particular message. Hopefully readers can take something meaningful to themselves from different stories. I hope to entertain first and foremost, and if something I wrote gets somebody to re-examine reality from a new and slightly unconventional perspective, then that is great.

Find out more about Céline at celineterranova.com.
You can also follow Céline on Twitter and Facebook.

“Sealed Bid” – Sep/Oct 2018

Céline Terranova is a Belgian writer living in London, UK. Always an avid reader, she wrote her first story when she was 11. She honed her writing skills with fanfictions published successfully online. Since then, she has worked on short stories, screenplays, non-fiction books and novellas in both French and English. She is now finishing her first YA dystopian novel, Healers.

 

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
Dystopian worlds are what interest me the most. I’m finishing a novel in a dystopian London riddled with disease. I also write non fiction books, and I enjoy writing for other media: I’ve recently finished the script of a short film and my next project is a fiction podcast.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
Like many people, J.K. Rowling was a huge influence. Philip Pullman, Tolkien, Orson Scott Card, and before that Pierre Bordage and Alexandre Astier (both French) have all impacted me. Recently, I’ve discovered Pierce Brown and it’s been quite an influence too.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
What. I’m trying to pass on is a message of hope. You’re not alone, you’re not broken or a freak, things can be grim now but they’ll work out, don’t trust easily but trust fully when you do.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
Speculative fiction gives me a freedom that you don’t usually have with other genres. I find that it’s easier to talk about difficult subjects if I write then in a science fiction setting, because it’s not as direct and doesn’t trigger the reader’s inner censor.

Find out more about Alexander at alexanderwrites.com.
You can also follow Alexander on Twitter and Facebook.

“Madness at Miracle Mile” – Sep/Oct 2018

Alexander Thomas is an author, game designer, dog lover, karaoke enthusiast, and all around nerd. You may know him from his work on roleplaying games including Mutants & Masterminds for Green Ronin and New Millennium Games, as well as Quantum Black. Madness at Miracle Mile is a fantasy noir short story set within the same universe of his debut novel The Magician’s Sin.

 

Who are your favorite authors?
Charles Dickens, Jim Butcher, George R.R. Martin, Grant Morrison, Scott Snyder, H.P. Lovecraft, Jane Austen, Seth Grahame-Smith, J.R.R. Tolkien, Alan Moore, Homer, Jack Kirby, Bill Finger.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I am constantly writing super hero fiction but also products for super hero and horror roleplaying games. I design villains, I create adventures, and I am a prolific convention and home Game Master. I love to write noir, fantasy, science fiction, and horror when I can.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
A Tale of Two Cities really showcases the sort of protagonist I identify with in my writing and reading: the Byronic hero. I love deeply sardonic, broken men who learn how to be something better during the story. The Hobbit is my favorite adventure story and Superman comics/graphic novels are my super hero inspiration.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
The main message I seek to convey through my work is the role of power in society and the responsibilities of those who possess it. My current work in progress: The Magician’s Sin, also starring Anson, has a number of characters who each have different opinions on this subject. I also want to showcase men with different types of masculinity, rather than just the toxic, macho version we see so often.

You can find out more about Keith at www.keithwillisauthor.com.
You can also follow him on Twitter and Facebook.

“Have a Nice Trip” – Halloween 2018

Keith W. Willis managed to sneak out of Berry College with an English degree. He resides in upstate NY with his wife Patty, who graciously proofreads his stories even though she doesn’t like fantasy. Keith’s interests include reading, camping, and cutthroat games of Scrabble. He began writing seriously in 2008, when the voices in his head got too annoying to ignore. He also manages a group of database content editors at a global information technology firm to support his writing habit. His published books include TRAITOR KNIGHT and DESPERATE KNIGHT. His work-in-progress, ENCHANTED KNIGHT, is projected for publication in 2019.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I’m a pretty eclectic reader. I consume a lot of fantasy and sci-fi, but I also love classic and cozy mysteries (Stout, Taylor), some romance (Lauren Willig’s Pink Carnation series is a particular favorite), and quite a bit of YA (Brenda Drake, K.L. Young). Plus British humour (P.G. Wodehouse!!!).


Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
My primary genre is swashbuckling fantasy/romance. I love having a bit of fun with classic fantasy tropes. For example, the only reason my hero gets out of the first chapter of Traitor Knight alive is that the dragon he must fight comes down with a case of hiccups.


What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
P.G. Wodehouse, Terry Pratchett, and Michael J. Sullivan. And of course the fabulous S. Morgenstern. If you must ask who the latter is, you’re not my friend…
[Editorial Note:  I agree.  -B.K.]

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
Not really. My stories are written with no message in mind, but primarily are designed to entertain. Most of my work features main characters who don’t themselves particularly seriously; a lot of light-hearted adventure; a dash of witty banter and romance; and a dragon with a case of hiccups.

Follow Cassondra on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
You can find her books on Amazon, with links in her bio to the right.

“A Sympathetic Relationship” – Sep/Oct 2018

Cassondra Windwalker’s poetry, short stories, and essays have been published in numerous literary and art books. Her novel Parable of Pronouns is available now, and Bury The Lead will be released September 2018. She writes from the coast of Alaska with the help of a tolerant husband, a scaredy-dog, and a ghost cat.

 

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read? My favorite stories combine elements of the fantastic – which I consider far more real than plastic life – with serious philosophical questions. I delight in the absurdity of truth and the pedantry of magic.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about? Poetry is my first and primary art form, and of course likewise the most penurious and unpublishable. Other than that, anything with an angry edge and a sense of humor.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences? Oh, gosh. So many…Poe, Hemingway, Pyle, Stewart, Heaney, L’Amour, Tolkien, Chadwick, Lang, Shakespeare, Heinlein, Lawhead…and most everything else in the library.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest? Speculative fiction often addresses head-on the questions that other fiction dances around. It goes straight to the heart of the human condition and breaks down the reality of the soul, whether that soul is housed in a dragon, a computer chip, or what the rest of the world considers a person.

More amazing authors coming very soon!

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