CONTRIBUTORS: PAGE THREE

Our main goal here at The Kyanite Press is to uplift indie voices. We hope to discover new talent, work with established authors, and create a truly unique and cutting-edge journal. Please check out our contributors and support them by visiting their websites, following them on social media, and purchasing a copy of The Kyanite Press!

You can find out more about Arthur at arthurmacabe.com, and you can find him on Twitter.

“The Schlikt” – Halloween 2018
“Human” – MAY/JUN 2019

Arthur Macabe is a writer of science fiction, horror, fantasy and the strange. In addition to his writing projects, he conducts weekly interviews with other writers, inspiring others in the pursuit of the craft and discovering new stories.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I love stories which make me think and take me to and fun and unexpected place.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I love to write science fiction and fantasy, as well as non-fiction about engineering and construction practices.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
The Sword of Shannara was one of the first books I read. That feeling I had when I finished the book is the same feeling I hope my readers discover when they read my work.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
There can be a sense of adventure no matter where you are. I also strive for a positive twist in my stories, the primary character discovering a new sense of freedom.

Mack

You can contact Gary via email and follow him on Twitter. Website coming soon!

“The Magpie’s Call” – JUL/AUG 2019
“The Dreams of Aeflynn Valkslander” – Autumn 2019
“Translation” – Winter 2020
“Finding the Coward” – Summer 2020

Gary John Mack has spent most of his career in the NHS and Local Government in the UK. He has always scribbled down stories for fun, and there is a photograph of him somewhere aged 11 typing up Doctor Who stories on a typewriter. In 2017 he had a life changing event which helped create a bucket list that included a wish to be published. The Magpie’s Call is his first published work. He lives in Lichfield, Staffordshire with his wife and three sons.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I like stories that have twists and turns, especially those that have a “pay off” that shocks or surprises. I also like complex stories or novel plots that make me think or look something up that I’m not sure about or could research.

Who are your favorite authors?
Fantasy: Brandon Sanderson, Brent Weeks, Peter V Brett, David Eddings
Sci Fi: Gareth L Powell, Peter F Hamilton, Iain. M. Banks,
Historical: Bernard Cornwall
Horror/Suspense: S. King, CJ Tudor

Favorite author at present is James Oswald, who brilliantly mixes crime and the supernatural.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I have written lots of fantasy over a period of about twenty years, but recently have took to writing speculative horror and hard sci fi short stories too. I am currently writing a crime novel with a real twist which I am trying to finish in the next few months.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
The scope. You can really take a story down a path that fixed genres rarely allow. I like fiction that knocks down the genre walls entirely.

thomas marcantonio

You can connect with Thomas on Twitter.

“The Walker” – Spring 2020

Tomas Marcantonio is a novelist and short story writer from Brighton, England. His fiction has appeared in numerous magazines and journals, both online and in print. Tomas is currently based in Busan, South Korea, where he teaches English and writes whenever he can escape the classroom. You can follow him on Twitter @TJMarcantonio

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?

I love to mix things up with the kinds of stories I read, so I usually take turns between genres – primarily literature, dystopian, crime, and fantasy. More than anything, I like to feel that I’m learning while I’m reading, so I enjoy anything that’s well written.

Who are your favorite authors?

Some of my comfort authors are Raymond Chandler, Haruki Murakami, and Ernest Hemingway, but recent favourites include Annie Proulx, China Mieville, Donald Ray Pollock, and Ursula Le Guin – I’m sure I’ll be reading a lot more of them in the coming months and years.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?

I love to explore new worlds in my writing; future societies, especially. Many of my stories are inspired by living in South Korea, and I love writing about travel. I find that travelers make particularly fun characters to write – they’re so often lost.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?

I love reading and writing about how we might be living in the future. With technology and the environment always changing around us, there are so many ways it can go. Ideas that might seem completely out there often turn out to be pretty close to reality.

Melissa-Matos

You can find out more about Melissa at her website, and can follow her on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

“The Iron Sorcerer” – Autumn 2019

Melissa Matos is a lover of stories in many forms, including novels, games, and music. She has a weekly podcast—Unboxing Story, enjoys tabletop RPGs that inspire her to make great characters, and creates geeky music.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I enjoy stories with interesting, snarky, flawed characters and thoughtful worldbuilding. Also dragons and dystopias.

Who are your favorite authors?
Patrick Rothfuss, Jim Butcher, and Ted Chiang.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
I would like to show people thinking they know how the world works learn something new, and how that changes their perspective. For example, what is real strength, or sacrifice, or power? It may not be what you think.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
I love the opportunity to allow the world to become the metaphor, and have characters having crazy fun adventures. Speculative fiction allows my imagination to run wild.

David Mcalister

You can find out more about David at his website, and can follow him on Twitter.

“The Teacup” – Nov/Dec 2018

David McAllister is a UK based writer and blogger with a love for stories that challenge our beliefs about the world. He loves to craft fiction that ask questions about where the human race are headed and what waits on the other side. He lives with his wife and four children so quite frankly its a miracle he finds time to write at all.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Challenging, mind bending and thought provoking fiction. Parallel worlds, technology gone awry and the human race having to re-evaluate their very existence.

Who are your favorite authors?
Stephen King is the master storyteller for me. I don’t think I would be a writer without his influence. Asimov, Heinlein and Phillip K. Dick are probably more indicative of my own writing style.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
I want to people to place themselves in my stories and make them question what it means to be human. I like to offer a form of escape in a world fast falling apart.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
Technology is playing an increasingly important role in our way of life. Its becoming harder to separate the human and the computer element. Speculative fiction is very close to home now and may well be science fact rather than science fiction in the next 50 years.

Find Richard at his website,
or follow him on Twitter.

“Shimmering in the Night” – Sep/Oct 2018
“Shadow Men” – Halloween 2018

Richard D Mellinger, Jr. was born and raised in Monterey, Ca. He has a BS and MS in Physics from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and San Diego State, respectively. He writes fiction of all sorts and loves physics, astronomy, writing, photography, and dogs… mostly dogs… all the dogs.

Who are your favorite authors?
Kurt Vonnegut, Christopher Moore, and Stephen King

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I don’t think there are many limits on the things I enjoy writing about. I just write whatever strikes my fancy. Sometimes it’s science fiction or fantasy. Other times it’s horror or literary. If you find a pattern, please let me know!


What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
The little voice inside my head that tells me what to write is a weird love child of all my favorite authors. Though, having read so much Kurt Vonnegut, Christopher Moore, and Stephen King, they tend to be the dominant ingredients.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
I like the freedom to explore and play in a world where I make the rules.

Mitchell

You can find out more about Michael at his website, and follow him on Twitter and Instagram.
You can also find his music at Reverbnation!

“The Circle’s Child” – Winter Digest 2018

Michael Mitchell, Jr. is a writer, illustrator, and musician living in beautiful Richmond, Virginia. He has been exploring imaginative worlds and developing characters for most of his life, and his passion for storytelling drives every aspect of his art and writing. Michael also enjoys reading, playing tabletop & video games, watching movies, and collecting way too many things.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I’ve always loved fantasy stories. It started with the Chronicles of Narnia, but I remember really getting hooked on the genre when I discovered L. Frank Baum’s The Tin Woodman of Oz at my elementary school library. I’m a fan of stories full of strange creatures, talking animals, magical items, heroic characters, and epic quests and journeys.

Who are your favorite authors?
Some of my favorite authors include John Steinbeck, C.S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, L. Frank Baum, Carl Barks, David Eddings, J.K. Rowling, Scott Snyder, and Kate DiCamillo.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
It’s not a book, but the original Star Wars trilogy had a huge impact on the formation of my imagination and storytelling. C.S. Lewis’s Narnia series introduced me to worldbuilding, allegory, wonder, and of course talking animals.
My mom Sharyn was also an amazing artist (writer & painter) with an incredible imagination and a gift for storytelling. One of my earliest memories was the two of us crafting a miniature zoo together (with cardboard, construction paper, and plastic animals). Our awesome menagerie filled the kitchen table! She always encouraged me to pursue the arts and to keep writing, imagining, and creating.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
I tend to gravitate toward the topics and themes of transformation, identity, mystery, hope, and the hero’s journey.

Find out more about Dennis at dennismombauer.com.
You can also follow Dennis on Twitter and Facebook.
Find “Die Novelle” HERE.

“A Passage of Time” – Sep/Oct 2018
“Below the Cubicle Sea” – Nov/Dec 2018
“Little Round Window” – Winter 2020
“The Dominion of Flies” – Spring 2020

Dennis Mombauer, *1984, currently lives in Colombo as a freelance writer of fiction, textual experiments, reviews; and essays on climate change and education.  He also is co-publisher of “Die Novelle–Magazine for Experimentalism”. He has publications in various magazines and anthologies. He published the German novel “Das Maskenhandwerk” (The Mask Trade) with AAVAA press in 2017.

 

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
Very often, my protagonists have crumbling palaces or networks of caverns snaking through their minds, and these places are not always empty. The other theme of my writing is cities, with an interest in their social workings and different strata, in how they function as human colonies and engines of progress.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
The usual suspects, from classics to genre literature. Some huge influences that may be lesser known: Daniel Ableev (my former colleague and an eminent strangeologist, always pushing the boundaries in all directions), Hugh Cook, Mark Z. Danielewski, Thomas Ligotti (the Lovecraft of our time), Jeff Long, Clark Ashton Smith, and Cordwainer Smith.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
For me, writing expresses what I cannot put into words otherwise, and what I might not even be consciously aware of. I would say that there are many different ways to look at the same thing, everybody gets lost, and what is important is to question yourself and try to be better.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
To view the world from a different perspective and to show how things could change. Naturalist fiction often ends up reinforcing the belief that the present state is without alternative. I find it important to have a layer of alienation from reality, a veil of dissociation, a filter through which to view the things that really matter.

michael-d-nadeau

You can find out more about Michael at his website and Goodreads, and connect with him on Twitter and Facebook.

“Last Race of the Animals” – Winter Digest 2018
“Dragon’s Fall” – MAR/APR 2019
“Fragmented Reality” – MAY/JUN 2019
“Chasing the Darkness” – Autumn 2019
“Journey to the Isle of Xim” – Winter 2020
“The Shattered Sea” – Spring 2020
“The Outer Rim” – Summer 2020

Born in the usual way, Michael D. Nadeau found fantasy at the age of 8 with Dungeons and Dragons. He loved being different people and casting magic. By the late 90’s he discovered his love for reading. His favorite teacher gave him her personal books to bring home, and he couldn’t get enough. He had even more ways to explore the great worlds out there, and it was harder and harder to come back.  When he was much older, and had created and destroyed more worlds than he could count, he decided to delve into the literary world. He created Lythinall, a place where he could tell epic stories and invite his readers on the journey with his characters. The Darkness Returns is the start of the journey, but certainly not the end.

Who are your favorite authors?
Well let’s see, this list can be pretty long but here goes: Ed Greenwood, Simon R. Green, Terry Goodkind, J.R.R. Tolkien, Mercedes Lackey, Michael Moorcock, Margaret Weis & Tracey Hickman, Stephen R. Donaldson, and the legendary Douglas Adams.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
Ed Greenwood (rich with intrigue and humor in the face of adversity…oh El, you slay me), Simon R. Green (the one-liners in his Deathstalker books inspired my humor as well and continuity in stories), and Margaret Weis (epic heart tugging stories and characters (one word…Raistlin)

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
In my Darkness Trilogy books I write about trying to overcome an impossible evil, bringing races split apart by hatred and war back together, and ultimately a new beginning for the whole land. Not really new concepts, but then the old ones are the best sometimes

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
First and foremost it takes me away from the troubles of the real world and brings me to a place that I can be something else. Secondly, it allows me to invent a whole new world where the reader can explore somewhere that they have never heard of.

Enricoh Alfonzo Naidu

You can find out more about Enricoh on his website and follow him on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

“Kitara and the Wonderful World of Real” – Winter Digest 2018

Enricoh Alfonzo Naidu is a writer, blogger & social media influencer who lives in the Indian suburb of Lenasia South, all the way in South Africa. When he’s not writing, reading or otherwise influencing; he’s snuggled up with his baby girl, Laci Alfonzo. Cuddling into her snowflake soft fur.

“By far my favorite grandkid.”
– Enricoh’s gran gran

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Fiction. Science Fiction, Fantasy, Romance. I especially love the ones that mix all of these elements into one book/series. What a treat!

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
Fiction. Science Fiction, Fantasy, Romance. Though as a writer I feel like my enjoyment is constantly evolving & being experimented with. Especially as a blogger, I’ve written posts outside my comfort zones that have been very memorable for me.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
J.K Rowling. Her books got me absolutely hooked on reading & storytelling. I’ve been devouring books ever since. To me she is the Greatest author ever, period. She makes me believe in more.
Harry Potter & Goblet of Fire is the first book I ever remember distinctly reading for pleasure. It’s my favorite in the series & I’ll always cherish my copy for all the doors into unlocked within my mind.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
“Words are Immortal.” ™

steven nedeau cropped

You can find out more about Steven on his website.  You can also follow him on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.  
The Soulweb is on Facebook too!

“In the Under Realm” – Nov/Dec 2018

Raised in NH, Steven M Nedeau excelled in writing and art, acted in plays, and even taught dance. A serious car accident derailed his artistic career during his senior year, delaying his entry to college by several years. Steven eventually studied engineering, working full time and studying part time, earning his Bachelor’s degree at night all while raising a family. His college degree behind him, Steven stepped back into the artistic world by writing his first book, The Soulweb.

Steven is now writing three books, Soulweb Sleeping (the sequel to The Soulweb), Soulweb Shattered (the end of The Soulweb Trilogy), and Phoenix (a science fiction novel). He also has been helping other writers with story formatting, editing, and script consulting.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
This Fantasy author is an avid reader of science fiction. I particularly enjoy stories that delve into the things that make us human, into what defines our consciousness. If the story makes me question my own ideas of who or what I am, it’s going to rank high on my list.

Who are your favorite authors?
Phillip K. Dick, Margaret Weiss, J.R.R Tolkien, JK Rowling, Piers Anthony, and William Gibson.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
Braham Stoker’s Dracula was one of the most jarring books I’ve ever read. At first I didn’t like it, but as I continued through the book I could feel the brilliance of the storytelling technique.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
Everyone has doubts and feelings inside that they aren’t as good as they should be. It’s ok to feel those things, but you shouldn’t let them hold you back. You are stronger than you realize. That strong confident guy you looked up to in high-school probably wasn’t any more strong or confident than you.

You can follow Jennifer on Twitter and Facebook.

“The Storyteller” – Halloween 2018

In third grade, Jennifer Nelson wrote a story about a girl who died to save her best friend. When her teacher’s only response was, “But she died!”, she knew she wanted to be an author. Now, she lives in Pennsylvania with two cats that get a little too involved with the writing process. When she’s not overthinking her urban fantasy stories, she plays video games, cross-stitches, listens to metal, studies tarot, and other contradictory activities.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
Colorful characters, magic, people figuring out how to communicate with each other, dreams


What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
Robin McKinley and Brian Jacque’s Redwall series were HUGE influences during my formative years. I don’t write about talking mice, but Redwall was the first inkling of my love of great characters. As for McKinley, she takes classic fairy tales and expands them, breathes new life into them and makes them her own. Also, though I only discovered Maggie Stiefvater a few months ago, and she’s already becoming a major influence. She tackles so many things, from pastel art to calligraphy to bagpipes and excels at them all because of, as she says, “infinite patience for practice”, and if that’s not inspiring, I don’t know what is.


Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
I’ve asked myself that a lot recently. When I write, I’m telling the story my characters are experiencing, without thought to theme or message until it was there all along. But there is one common message throughout – no matter what limitations you think you might have, be it difficulty with words, with hearing, with staying human, there is always someone out there who hears what you have to say, no matter how silently you say it.


What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
I love things that tickle the imagination, that show me things I’ve never seen or thought of before, that present outlandish ideas and show how they can be real. And now that I’m older, I love seeing what was wondrous as a kid getting all kinds of corrupted and twisted.

HansonOakSubcropped

Find out more about Hanson at his website, and folow him on Twitter!

“The Gulch” – Halloween 2018
“Black Hen Witch” – Winter Digest 2018
“Mercy Code” – MAY/JUNE 2019

Hanson Oak has worked in film and television as well as publications such as Fangoria. Born to well-meaning parents in the badlands of New York, his imagination took hold early, leading him on adventures he documents for his stories. He currently resides in the hills of northwestern Connecticut with his wife, two sons and dog.  

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I love an underdog story. A well rounded protagonist constantly in the shadow of a powerful antagonist. The more dangerous and seemingly impossible the odds against him/her the better.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
The draw to writing for me is the idea that I am taking a story that my imagination has crafted and then, through the power of reading, places that story into another person’s imagination but unlike watching a movie/TV, the details of setting and character are created by the reader, therefore making it a unique experience.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
Richard Matheson stands on a podium to me. Reading I am Legend and 12 Step to Midnight had a profound effect on my own writing. I’ve been marked by many other authors since then but he left the deepest scar.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
Any good story has elements of many different genres and being restricted into one or two is a noose around the throat of creativity. The SpecFic umbrella allows a free movement between genres in a singular work and separate pieces, allowing for more interesting stories.

Follow Aaron on Twitter.

“Ex Infernalis” – Halloween 2018

Aaron Palmer is a writer of horror and dark fantasy. He lives in Lexington, Kentucky with his wife, dog, and four cats. When not writing, he enjoys reading, working at the library, and listening to heavy metal music.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Stories where not a lot is explained to the reader, stories with gripping plots, stories with worlds you want to go live in.

Who are your favorite authors?
George R. R. Martin, Glen Cook, J.K. Rowling, H.P. Lovecraft, M.R. James, Jay Kristoff, Pierce Brown, Alex Marshall.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
H.P. Lovecraft. I love his style of writing, and the fact that he rarely, if ever, shows you exactly what is so horrifying. It’s definitely something I try to emulate in my fiction.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
I enjoy spending time in worlds different from our own. I spend so much time in the real world, it’s fun to leave and mentally inhabit a place where impossible things can happen

Papandreou

You can follow George on Twitter and be sure to check out his webcomic Typical Campus.

“Jaw Droppers” – JUL/AUG 2019

George Papandreou is an up and coming New York based writer. He’s most well known for creating and writing his popular web comic, Typical Campus. The slice of life web comic is where he has found moderate success on Line Webtoon. His storytelling style in prose focuses on character struggle and overcoming extreme obstacles. Being an undergraduate, he mostly spends his time studying and working towards his future. When he does come out with new projects he makes sure to keep his fans notified on social media.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Stories that are on a very large scale, literally and emotionally. I feel partially biased to epic stories. They give me the impression that there is more to life than the typical things we encounter in it.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I heavily enjoy writing comedy. When I make serious fiction that succeeds, I feel accomplished. When I write absolutely asinine comedy fiction, I don’t take it seriously and simply have fun with it.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
I find the famous comic book writer Geoff Johns to be very influential to me. As a child I had a difficult time reading. His work in comics was my perfect entry point into literature. A big influence on my writing itself is Rod Serling. His style of writing knows how to grasp the reader’s attention and keep it until they understand the point of his stories.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
I feel like while realistic fiction has its place in literature, speculative fiction has almost no limits. They are able to be emotionally realistic and yet fantastical at the same time.

paschal cropped

You can find more of Thomas’ work with Dark Gatekeeper Gaming at Drive Thru Fiction.
You can also follow him on Twitter, Vampire Freaks, and Twitch.

“The First Adaron” – Winter Digest 2018

Thomas Paschal is a gamer, word-nerd, and endless dispenser of weird ideas that “can’t possibly work”. He is from North Carolina, USA. Creating stories since childhood, he has finally decide to unleash the tempest in his mind on an unsuspecting world. Many have been quick to judge and even quicker to tell him that he will fail. But he is quicker to prove them wrong.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
My favorite stories are ones that can make me feel. Ones that dare to be different. And ones that can make me think. If a story can engage my mind and my emotions, it’s got me.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I enjoy experimenting with different genres and what defines them. What people expect when they hear, “This is sci-fi. This is fantasy. This is romance.” Taking those expectations and then going a different way with them.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
My influences are in part from the works of others. Mostly fantasy and heroism. The works of Homer, Poe, Sophecles and Naoko Takeuchi; to name a few. But, I also draw a good bit of inspiration from people I know, songs I hear, and experiences I’ve had.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
Fiction of any kind, to me, is about exploring possibilities and asking “What if…?” Exploring how things could be can give insight into how they are, or were, or will be.

peter-philleo-lg

You can find out more about Peter on his website, and connect with him on Twitter and in his writing group.

“Nothing is Free” – MAY/JUN 2019

Peter A. Philleo is a longtime web site developer and cryptography and blockchain software developer to pay the bills, and a longtime writer of short and long fiction across all genres, which doesn’t help pay the bills at all. He’s an avid reader of sci-fi and fantasy/adventure, homebrewer of fine ales and lagers, and professional cat herder at his home in South Florida. He shares this sunny oasis with his wife Erin and two cats, all of whom join him on occasional motorhome-based explorations of the United States.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read? For genres, fantasy/adventure. For content, anything that doesn’t have an obvious agenda or lesson it wants to hit me over the head with. If it’s natural to the story, and snuck in gracefully, I love to discover the writer’s purpose and goal accidentally.

Who are your favorite authors?
Branden Sanderson, Mark Lawrence, Brent Weeks, Larry Correia, Terry Goodkind, Stephen R. Donaldson (oh, the dictionaries he must have burned through in writing the early Thomas Covenant novels).

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
It feels like every story I write is exploring or solving some personal insight or difficulty I have in my own life, or dealing with some new truth I’ve discovered. In this case of this particular story, I’m dealing with my concern about where an ever-present blockchain might take society.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
As a writer, it’s sometimes eye-opening to realize you can get away with writing anything in spec fic. Anything goes, and even better if you can do it well. Tentacles, pod-people, alien reincarnation, religious turtles, bisexual cows, cultists who worship triangles; there are no rules, and it’s fun to explore.

You can find out more about Helen at helenpower.ca.
You can also follow her on Twitter and Instagram.

“Dark Reverie” – Halloween 2018

Helen Power is an academic librarian living in Windsor, Canada. In her spare time, she haunts deserted cemeteries, loses her heart to dashing thieves, and cracks tough cases, all from the comfort of her writing nook. She has several short stories published, including ones in Suspense Magazine, Polar Borealis, and a Canada 150 anthology published by Dark Helix Press. She is currently working on her debut novel.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
My favourite stories tend to feature female characters who are strong, yet authentically imperfect. Otherwise I read broadly, like I’m feasting at a buffet. I enjoy sampling the macabre to the cozy, the humorous to the dire, the realistic to the WTF did I just read?

Who are your favorite authors?
Tess Gerritsen, Kim Harrison, Kelley Armstrong, Sarah J. Maas, Richard Mattheson, Julie Garwood, Edgar Allan Poe, Sophie Kinsella, Vicki Pettersson… (Like I said, I read broadly!)

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I enjoy writing in all genres—from cozy mystery to weird fiction. All my stories have flawed, yet (hopefully) relatable characters who are tossed into impossible and peculiar situations.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
Speculative fiction provides the unique opportunity to escape into a world that’s similar to ours, yet different. Or a world that’s different from ours, yet similar. I love exploring speculative fiction that can be enjoyed both by skimming the surface level and by delving deep into the metaphors that represent real-life challenges and themes.

michaelprihoda

You can find out more about Michael at his website, and more about After the Pause here.

“Numbers in the Dust” – Winter Digest 2018

Michael Prihoda lives in central Indiana. He is the editor of After the Pause, an experimental literary magazine and small press. His work has received nominations for the Pushcart Prize and the Best of the Net Anthology and he is the author of eight poetry collections.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I seem to be drawn most to writing stories that don’t easily fit into a certain genre or that don’t easily take a certain literary stance. Writing, in its endless possibilities, is like a strange, dangerous playground. I hope to capture a childlike schizophrenia in my writing.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
Kelly Link, Neil Gaiman, Jeff Vandermeer, and China Mieville. Each of them produces wildly inventive fiction in short and long form. Their stories can sway from realistic to speculative to just plain weird in the blink of a sentence, all the while holding an enchantment over the reader.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
The world is often more confusing and illusory than we’d like to admit. Instead of hiding from that truth, I want my work to embrace it, to tackle it head-on, though in a much zanier way than traditional literary fiction might.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
Speculative fiction is a genre that has yet to be overrun with triteness and boredom. It is a space where things can be opaque and strange and somehow hauntingly reminiscent of the world we inhabit. I love how speculative work can bend itself into myriad genres while retaining an essence of the real.

provance

Connect with Alan on Twitter!

“The Voidship” – Winter 2020
“Thunder Oh Six” – Summer 2020

Alan Provance grew up in southern New Hampshire, and has been reading fantasy and science fiction books from a young age. Also an avid tabletop gamer, he’s been writing for campaigns and characters since his teen years, and developed a passion for reading and writing that lasted throughout his life. After a few years in the military, Alan finished school to become a history teacher. He still lives in southern New Hampshire with his family.

 

Who are your favorite authors?

J.R.R. Tolkien, Jacqueline Carey, George R.R. Martin, Ray Bradbury, and Edgar Rice Burroughs are my top five favorite authors.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?

I majored in European History, and I really enjoy studying and writing analyses about history in general. Seeing the influences of merging cultures and how societies move through the world together is endlessly fascinating.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?

Edgar Rice Burroughs is a tremendous influence for sure, and Joseph Campbell’s work has inspired my view of heroes and epics in general. Neil Gaiman is also a huge influence; I love the almost casual way he adds depth to so much in his worlds.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?

Speculative fiction gives authors freedom to explore social scenarios and settings that haven’t existed. There’s no need to suspend disbelief if it’s well written.

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You can find out more about Enkelli on his blog, and connect with him on Twitter.

“The Thing Inside” – Sep/Oct 2018
“3 Morton Place” – Halloween 2018
“Dylath” – Winter 2020

Enkelli Arn Robertson is a speculative fiction author who tells the truth by writing lies.  He enjoys spending time in his own worlds, which he sometimes invites others to visit. He is an avid student of military history; which often informs his writing. He is also a tabletop gamer with interest in numerous role playing games and miniature war games.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Hardboiled detective stories, fantasy, military sci-fi, horror, and historical.

Who are your favorite authors?
H.P Lovecraft, J.R.R. Tolkien, Raymond Chandler, and Dashiell Hammett.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I love writing crime fiction. Something about building a mystery and allowing a character to solve it is very satisfying.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
Exploring new worlds and visiting places that I couldn’t visit otherwise.

Find out more about A.A. Rubin  on his website,
and follow him on Twitter and Facebook.

He is also on Deviant Art!

“Darkness My Old Friend” – Sep/Oct 2018

A. Rubin‘s work has appeared recently in publications such as Kyanite Press, Bards Annual, and Cowboy Jamboree. He has won numerous awards for his prose, flash fiction, comics, and poetry. Mr. Rubin, who holds a BA from Columbia University in Writing/Literature and an MA from Teachers College, Columbia University can be reached on twitter, facebook, and instagram, as @TheSurrealAri, or through his website AARubin.wordpress.com.

 

 

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
Most of my writing is either really funny or really dark. In addition to SFF, I also write literary fiction and comics. My first graphic novel is scheduled to be released by Golden Bell Studios later this year.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
Tennyson wrote, “I am a part of all who I have met.” All authors, I believe, are influenced by “all who they have read.” My influences include Terry Pratchett, Charles Dickens, Kurt Vonnegut, JRR Tolkien, Frank Miller, Bruce Springsteen, all of the Romantics, Neil Gaiman, Shakespeare, and Franz Kafka.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
Most people face a choice between love and security. Modern society pushes us toward choosing security, to choose the rational over the emotional. My work advocates for the opposite, for the choice of love and the acceptance of truths beyond what we can prove rationally.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
There is a magic in the speculative that allows us to access truths we cannot consider in a purely rational setting. Shakespeare knew this, as did Homer, Emily Bronte, and even Dickens. There is something about SFF that lends itself to the bigger philosophical and moral questions.

P T Ryan cropped

You can find out more about P.T. at his website and follow him on Twitter.

“Wide Open Parking Spaces” – JAN/FEB 2019

P. T. Ryan was born and raised on the North Coast of Ohio and has been a high school Math teacher. He is currently applying his talents in the world of casino security. An avid reader since an early age, he is now trying his hand on the other side of the page, hoping to give back some of the enjoyment he has received for so long.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Long stories or series, such as “The Stand,” or Asimov’s Foundation stories. They draw you in and won’t let go for quite some time are a favorite. Anything imaginative and thought provoking.

Who are your favorite authors?
Isaac Asimov, Frank Herbert, Stephen King, and I am a late-comer to the party with Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
“Dune,” by Frank Herbert. Herbert wove together religion, ecology, biology, politics, and several other subjects to create a world where it was hard to tell if I was reading a novel or watching a documentary.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
In speculative fiction, the author creates a world and invites others to join them. That world may work like ours, it might not. The author has thoughts and ideas and is willing to share, to entertain and give readers something to think about.