Our main goal here at The Kyanite Press is to uplift indie voices. We hope to discover new talent, work with established authors, and create a truly unique and cutting-edge journal. Please check out our contributors and support them by purchasing a copy of The Kyanite Press!

You can find out more about Samantha at pepperwrites.com, and about her series at nothingbutglory.com.
You can also follow Samantha on Twitter.

“For the Greater Good” – Sep/Oct 2018

Samantha Amenn is a freelance writer who lives in Chicago with their spoiled pup. Their story “A War’s Soul” was published in the Yoroiden Samurai Troopers 30th Anniversary Fanzine, their flash fiction “Unquiet Grave” was published in the online magazine, Short Fiction Break and their two speculative stories “Sunday Bloody Sunday” and “Manfred” were published in the Virginia Military Institute’s literary magazine the Sounding Brass. They are currently working on their first speculative novel For the Next Killer Who Dies.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I love writing about revolutionaries and madmen, the kind of people who shape the world. I also love writing about worlds that are on the cusps of great change, where the old rules no longer work, because I think that’s when we truly see what characters are made of.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
The authors that had the biggest impact on me are Ray Bradbury, Alan Moore, Stanislaw Lem, J. R. R. Tolkien, Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, Shirley Jackson, Victor Hugo, Albert Camus, David Mitchell, and Hamid Ismailov. They subverted expectations while providing incisive social commentary, which is what I strive to do.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
I think the message is: stay true to yourself, so the world must accommodate you and not the other way around. Many of my characters are difficult people, but they know who they are, and they refuse to bend to a world that doesn’t want to accept them.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
Speculative fiction interests me because it’s a real-life version of Dorian Gray’s picture. We can try to appear as pristine and charitable as we like, but speculative fiction reveals us as we are-horrific and beautiful. It doesn’t condemn, however, it offers redemption, if people are willing to listen.

Zachary is online at zacharyashford.com, Twitter and Facebook.

“Scolopendra” – Halloween 2018

Zachary Ashford is the former creative director of a rock n roll radio-station, heavy metal journalist, and current high school teacher. Born in the UK, but a long-time resident of Brisbane in Australia, he likes his horror pulsing with monsters, breathless with tension and soaked in blood. His work has also been published in Dark Moon Digest.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
While I have a soft spot for schlock horror, I love a horror story that makes some sort of social comment. I read a lot, and if it’s got a monster and something to say, I’m pretty much a sucker for it.

Who are your favorite authors?
There are so many. It’s really hard to go past an author like Stephen King. He really sets the bar. I’m a big fan of Chuck Palahniuk. Authors like Tad Williams, Neal Stephenson, China Mieville write incredible stories – and then there are the classics: Hemingway, Steinbeck, Shelley…does Shakespeare count?
[Editorial Note: Yes.  -B.K.]

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I like to write the kind of stories I’d like to read. For me, it’s about looking at a finished product I’ve crafted and knowing I’d like to read it. I like to come up with creative ways to ask questions about the world around me.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
It sounds clichéd, but the pure escapism of it. For me, these are the stories I grew up on, and nothing transports you to a world of childlike wonder like a story that adds a touch of the mystical or unexplainable to the world we know.

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Find out more about K. & Lyra on their website, Twitter, and Amazon!

“The Nemesis” – Halloween 2018

K. Baldwin and Lyra Ricci have been close friends for over ten years now, and counting. They have to be; they usually wind up in the same padded cell from time to time. They enjoy passing stories back and forth between one another, and though they live many hours apart (Save for the time spent in the aforementioned padded Hilton) they have the uncanny knack of causing mischief on a worldwide scale. Unless supervised, of course. Note: K. and Lyra should be used as a topical solution only. Do not take them orally. Lyra is safe as a suppository only in emergency situations.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Fantasy or horror. Maybe a humorous narrative non-fiction

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I enjoy writing fan-fiction. I have friends in several fandoms that love to get special fics as gifts.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
There was a very old series when I was a child called Billy and Blaze. I was crazy about horses growing up and that series really whetted my appetite for reading.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
The underdog can always come out on top. Almost always.

COMING SOON!

Berman-Gorvine, Martin

You can find out more about Martin at his website and his blog, and follow him on Twitter.
You can find out more about Days of Ascension HERE.
Martin’s books are on Amazon.

“The Greatest Confidence” – Nov/Dec 2018

Martin Berman-Gorvine is author of the ”Days of Ascension” horror novel series published by Silver Leaf Books: All Souls Day (2016), Day of Vengeance (2017), Day of Atonement (2018), and Judgment Day (coming spring 2019).  He has also authored seven science fiction novels: the Sidewise Award-winning The Severed Wing (as Martin Gidron) (Livingston Press, 2002);  36 (Livingston Press, 2012);  Seven Against Mars (Wildside Press, 2013);  Save the Dragons! (Wildside Press, 2013), which was a finalist for the Prometheus Award;  Ziona: A Novel of Alternate History (as Marty Armon), an expansion of the short story ”Palestina,” published in Interzone  magazine, May/June 2006 (Amazon/CreateSpace, 2014);  Heroes of Earth (Wildside Press, 2015);  and Monsters of Venus (Wildside Press, 2017). 


Martin lives in Maryland with his wife, the youngest of his three sons, four cats, and two dogs. 

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Satirical science fiction, psychological horror, or anything with well-developed characters.

Who are your favorite authors?
Robert Charles Wilson, Stephen King, John Lukacs (the historian), Henry David Thoreau

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I am drawn to stories about overcoming the overcoming of various forms of captivity, physical, psychological, and spiritual. People don’t value their freedom highly enough.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
The fantastic creatures, landscapes, and events of speculative fiction can free the imagination to address some of the burning concerns of everyday life that otherwise can slip between the artist’s fingers.

You can find out more about I.M. at his Facebook page.

“Harold and the Cookie” – Halloween 2018

I.M. Bolt is the pen name for an academic hiding from nosey colleagues who (wrongly) think that writing about monsters and airships disqualifies them as a serious writer. When not writing, Bolt likes to drink coffee and/or fine cognac while disappearing into some other author’s world through a book (and will continue to do so, at least until the TARDIS shows up to do it for real). The author lives in the wilds of New England with their partner, two future authors, their faithful dog Chewbacca and the ghosts of at least two cats.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
Steampunk! Many of my pieces are placed in alternate versions of local historical settings, with the ever important question of “what if?” driving the change. I can’t seem to help playing with time and space, and usually throwing in a monster or two, just for good measure!

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
Authors I read over and over include Neil Gaiman, J.K. Rowling, C.S. Lewis, Jane Austin and Stephen King. From them I learned the basics of character, language, world building and plot. More recent influencers on my writing style include Lemony Snicket, Stacey Richter, Scott Westerfield and Diane Wynne Jones.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
I like to challenge expectations while still being entertaining. Philosophical questions like “What makes someone a monster?” can be explored in ways that are fun and drive the plot forward, while leaving the reader intellectually satisfied. Mary Shelly showed us this was possible 200 years ago, so why not try?

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
The sense of possibility and wonder, even when those things ultimately lead to more difficult emotions, like fear or moral outrage at injustice. In this format we are free to build worlds that are both far kinder and more brazenly fantastic than the one we currently inhabit.

You can find out more about Mike at mochapman.com.
You can also follow him on Twitter.

“Hiss, Whistle, and Crack” – Halloween 2018

Mike Chapman is a Science teacher who lives in the rolling golden fields of Suffolk in the UK with his wonderful wife and three lovely daughters. He enjoys reading horror and Golden Age science fiction and has written stories ever since he was little. His crime and speculative fiction short stories have been published in print and electronically in the UK and US and he has won national competitions for them. Mike is currently editing a collection of short stories in a range of genres and hopes to be publishing it soon.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I like stories that are tightly-written and structured. One of my favourites is Catch-22 because of how it’s told in a non-linear manner: actions in it echo backwards and forwards throughout the novel. I also like anything that has a vision of the future that’s never been explored before.

Who are your favorite authors?
My favourite authors are: Isaac Asimov – for the scope and optimism of the distant futures he imagines; Alastair Reynolds – for his grungy, morally-ambiguous Revelation Space universe; HP Lovecraft, and the early works of Stephen King – because some of his short stories are terrifying!

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
One of my favourite stories is ‘The Shadow Over Innsmouth’ by HP Lovecraft. Not only is it a deeply creepy story, but it also doesn’t reference his overfamiliar Mythos. At its core, it’s a story about inevitability and decline: both the protagonist and the town have an inescapable, unpleasant fate.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
I think it’s the ability of speculative fiction to change some aspect of our present or hypothesised future and see how that affects people and society. If humans developed the technology for immortality and lived for a million years, would we still be human or would we be something new?

Find out more about Chad and read his blog at chaddchristy.com.
He does the Twitter (badly) and the Facebook (very badly).

He shares his interests and visual inspirations on Pinterest.

“Echoing Carcossa” – Halloween 2018
“Worth Dying For” – Nov/Dec 2018

Chad D. Christy is just a guy who likes to write. He’s been a journalist, a retail manager, a dungeon master, a self-defense instructor, and a paramedic. His first story was scrawled in crayon at the age of six. His most recent work, That’s What Neighbors Are For, is a collection of literary short stories. He has also written two novels: the steampunk horror adventure, Through the Blind, and American Fantasy, an adventure set in an arcane post-apocalypse.

He currently lives with his wife and son in Columbus, Ohio.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
If a story has great characters, I’m in. If I don’t care about the characters, I don’t care about the story. I need characters who are relatable, sympathetic, or at least interesting. And they must operate with an intrinsic consistency.

Who are your favorite authors?
First, thank you for not making me pick just one.
Robert A. Heinlein is top of my list, but after him, the line isn’t as smooth. In no particular order there’s H.P. Lovecraft and Robert W; Chambers. Edgar Rice Burroughs and Robert E. Howard; Raymond Carver and James Thurber; and Dashiell Hammett and Mickey Spillane.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work
Individual accountability and active hope. Active hope doesn’t sit waiting for the world to spontaneously get better; it’s a hope that drives forward spreading the light the world needs. Without individual accountability, active hope cannot exist. If we don’t take responsibility for ourselves, and instead blame others for our woes, we can’t even get started.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
The best thing about these stories is how even subtle changes to the nature of reality can direct a reader to examine deeply-rooted, unquestioned conventions. When done right, speculative fiction can ask powerful questions and penetrate the most stubborn minds with grace and precision.

Clark, Adrienne

You can find out more about Adrienne at her website, and follow her on Twitter, Instagram, and Goodreads.
You can also find her books on Amazon.

“Away” – Winter Digest 2018

A past winner of the Alice Munro short fiction contest, Adrienne Clarke’s work has appeared in several publications including, New Plains Review, Silly Tree Anthologies, and in the e-zines The Devilfish Review, Rose Red Review and the Long Island Literary Journal. Her first YA novel, Losing Adam, garnered a silver medal in the Independent Publisher Book Awards.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I’m a passionate reader of books of all kinds, but the stories that have stayed with me are the ones that inspired a deep sense of empathy, so much so that when I look back on the characters and their struggles I still feel my breath catch a little.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
A lot of writers have inspired me in different ways, but the three that come immediately to mind are Emily Bronte whose darkly romantic voice always inspires me; Alice Munro for her unmatched ability to somehow transform the ordinary into something extraordinary, and Kazuo Ishiguro for his devastating prose and buried anguish. There is nothing sentimental about his writing and yet I can still recall passages from his books that made me sob. Haunting and restrained, this is the kind of writing I admire most.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
I’ve always been attracted to the concept of epiphany: a moment of shimmering truth, large or small, experienced by one of my characters. I always hope that my readers, on some level, can experience that feeling of illumination.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
Raised on fantasy novels, reading inspired me to always look for doors to other worlds. I may not have found my Narnia yet, but I still believe in magic. A lover of all things mysterious and unexpected, I’m drawn to speculative fiction because I think it allows us to explore human nature in a different, and sometimes, wholly unexpected way.

Find out more about Stephen at scoghlan.com.
You can also connect with him on Twitter, Facebook, and Goodreads.

“Targeted” – Sep/Oct 2018
“The Prisoner’s Diary” – Halloween 2018
“The Last Ride of the Inferno Train”
Winter Digest 2018

Hailing from the capital of the Great White North [Canada]Stephen Coghlan spends his days erecting buildings, and his nights reveling in the dreamscape. Since 2017, he has produced a myriad of flash fictions, short stories, novellas and novels, including, but not limited to, the GENMOS Saga, the Nobilis series, and has had his works read on podcasts and featured in anthologies.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Anything, really. I absorb just about any book I can get my grubby fingers on, although I have a penchant for war documentaries and science fiction with cyberpunk themes.

Who are your favorite authors?
Anne McCaffrey, Frank Herbert, Neil Gaiman, J. Michael Straczynski, Garth Enis, Hiroaki Samura, just to name a few

Outside of books, what is your favorite format of storytelling?
I love to tell stories and jokes of experiences to people and watch them react. Verbal word crafting is a dying art.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
The ability to create and showcase your imagination. Each of us see the world in many lights, but only talk of the once society considers “normal.” Spec lit lets us light up all the shadows, or throw them into stark relief.

You can find out more about Gary on his website and follow him on Twitter.

“Classified:  Agent of D.A.R.T.”
– Halloween 2018

Gary Fagan is a Thirty-Five year old bachelor with no children or major responsibilities. And so, he spends much of his free time creating stories that interest and amuse him. He thought that if he enjoyed the stories, others might as well; which lead him to start sharing them with friends and loved ones.

From there he tried unsuccessfully many times to garner the attention of agents and publishers alike. The rejections process stung, but he continued writing anyway. He wrote them because in his mind, they needed to be written or they would have driven him mad.

[Editorial Note:  A little madness is a healthy part of the creative process.  – B.K.]

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
My favorite kinds of stories to read would be in the Urban Fantasy genre; if I had to nail down any one specific genre, but I also enjoy classic noir detective novels and the occasional Weird Tale.

Who are your favorite authors?
My favorite Authors are: Jim Butcher, Laurell K. Hamilton, Terry Brooks, Terry Goodkind, Cassandra Clare, Rick Riordan, Robert Jordan, Mickey Spillane, Franklin W. Dixon, and Piers Antony.

However, my favorite storyteller is Scheherazade. Simply for the fact that telling compelling stories literally saved her life.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I enjoy writing about a broad spectrum of subjects. From awkward romances to high flying action. Usually I tend to write about the stories I tell myself before I go to sleep. Sometimes they’re thrilling and filled with action and…uhm…yeah. Other times they’re filled with drama and emotion.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
I would say my biggest influences in the urban fantasy genre are Jim Butcher’s Dresden Files and Laurell K. Hamilton’s Anita Blake and Merry Gentry novels. When it comes to Weird Fiction and Sword and Sorcery I’d say my influence would be Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series and his Conan collections.

Felix, Kati cropped

You can find out more about Kati at her website, and follow her on Twitter and Instagram.  She also has poetry on Allpoetry!

“The Gate” – Winter Digest 2018

Kati Felix began her bizarre and fascinating career in middle school. As she grew older, writing morphed from a hobby into a full-on obsession. With international experience and a solid literary background, she hopes to share her writing with as many word-lovers as possible. When she’s not scaling the Swiss Alps in search of dragon eggs, she can be found among stacks of empty tea boxes and buckling bookshelves, typing out yet another story about immortal vikings or the ill-behaved Fae.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Some of my favorite stories of all time are Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson and The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allen Poe. The former is pure adventure, and the latter is darkness and terror. All these elements have shaped what I read and what I write.

Who are your favorite authors?
Without a doubt, Diana Gabaldon is top of the list, followed by Patricia Briggs, Tolkien, Anthony Ryan, Larissa Brown, Madeline Miller, and Holly Black. I have so many more, but these are always at the top of my TBR pile. Also anything about Vikings or Scotland is a huge bonus.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
While adventure, romance, and a twisted theme are compelling, I also adore writing characters who see themselves as deeply flawed and still try to give their best to others. I identify so much with the Aragorns of the world, the Vaelin Al Sornas, the October Dayes, and so many more.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
For UF/PR – Patricia Briggs. I began reading her Mercy Thompson and Alpha&Omega series in high school, and it has been an epic love affair. I mentioned Diana Gabaldon before. The way she uses subtle physicality to depict deep emotion and personality is a huge influence on my writing process.

Hansson, Marcus

You can find out more about Marcus at his website and follow him on Twitter.

“Stone Faces” – Nov/Dec 2018

Marcus Hansson studied law in Scotland and Sweden, which is where he discovered his love of places cold and quiet. After graduation, the obvious next step was to try and make a paltry living writing and working in video games. It’s still paltry, but it’s getting there. Hire him to write something, why don’t you! Link is to the left! Marcus begrudgingly lives in Paris, wishing for cold and quiet, like a little old man with surprisingly smooth skin.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
One of my favourite things in stories is when something in them gives form to a thought I’ve never been able to express. By doing that, stories reshape the world. Oh, and I’m a sucker for twists, revenge, and underdogs.

Who are your favorite authors?
Steven Erikson, Stephen King, Ursuka K. Leguin, Clive Barker. There will be more. I’m eternally grateful to these people. I’d be raving mad without them, or even worse, completely sane.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I also write for and about video games. Branching dialogue may occasionally break my brain, but it’s too awesome to ignore.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
Sometimes. Not in general. But if I did, I’d tell you to go read my work and find out there.

Find out more about Benjamin at his Website.
Follow him on Twitter and Instagram.
Find his books on Amazon and Goodreads.

“The Rookery at Smeaton Abbey”
– Sep/Oct 2018
“The Children of Blackmarsh” – Halloween 2018

Benjamin Hope is the author of Victorian gothic-steampunk crossover, The Procurement of Souls. His sequel, A New Religion, is due for release in 2019 and he is also currently working on a collection of cautionary fairy tales. He blogs regularly on the writing process and offers up recommendations in 60 words for speculative and gothic fiction on his website at www.benjamin-hope.com. He occasionally guest lectures at universities on public speaking and lives in Hertfordshire, in the UK, with his wife and daughter.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I’m a speculative man in the main but I love anything with a dark edge and messages or ideas that simmer below the surface. I love language too so poetic prose are a draw. Then again, I’m always ready to devour a brutal adventure from the likes of Joe Abercrombie.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
Countless authors have influenced (and continue to influence) me on my writing journey but to name a few and the reasons behind them: Edgar Allan Poe for his gothic verve; Joe Abercrombie for his pacing and characters; Susannah Clarke for her world building; and G.W.Dahlquist for his ingenious plots!

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
As The Rookery at Smeaton Abbey suggests, I love exploring fairy-tales, fables, allegories and everything in-between. Yet my newly released full-length debut, The Procurement of Souls, is a gothic-steampunk crossover about bio-alchemists! And this is the unifying factor; the thing that delights me most: story-telling through a gothic lens.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
The thing I love about speculative fiction is that the only limitation is your imagination. There is no end to the creativity it can inspire.

You can find more about Sage at their website www.storiesundermyskin.com.
You can also follow them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr.

“I Love My Town” – Halloween 2018

Sage P. Irwin publishes creepy, strange, and speculative short stories to their website and is working on branching out to wider audiences. They like to ask questions, imagine alternatives, and be scared. They are a queer and non-binary author who strives to normalize and explore the existence of these identities through their work. They hold a degree in English and gender studies from the University of Toronto, work in the nonprofit sector, and do most of their writing from an attic room in the Kawarthas.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I love scary stories, weird stories, and imaginative stories. I enjoy stories with narrators that are personal, reflective, and occasionally a little “off”. I love fiction that closely resembles the world we live in with just one thing out of place.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I write about haunted packages, alien encounters, demons, ghosts, and the end of the world. Currently, I’m working on a story about a journal that affects reality as well as a novella about a person and a gorilla roaming around a post-apocalyptic Vancouver.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
Queer and trans folks exist and we deserve to have our stories told. Gender neutral pronouns are something people should start getting used to. We are also allowed to be more than our identities. Not all of our stories have to revolve around coming out.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
I love the way some speculative fiction explores the dynamics of power and oppression in this world and others. I think SF can make for incredibly effective social commentary, reflecting on the questions raised by philosophy and politics in a creative way.

Darius Jones

You can find out more about Darius at his website, and follow him on Twitter and Goodreads.

“Breakpoint” – Nov/Dec 2018

Darius Jones’ stories have been published in Sobotka Literary Magazine, Strangelet Journal, Fiction Vortex and elsewhere. He lives in Virginia where he can usually be found in a local café writing his next piece.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Anything and everything. Comedy, satire, adventure, mystery, horror, science fiction, historical, philosophical, even literary fiction. I try to read and absorb the widest pallet of influences, voices and perspectives and then incorporate (steal!?) as many of their tricks as I can.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I also write a lot of historical fiction of a faux-Orientalist nature starring the hero Yusuf ibn Yaqzan. And I write some literary-style fiction focused on my experiences in Russia.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
I’ll give you my top 10, in no particular order: Dostoyevsky, Hammett, Poe, Borges, Rulfo, Basho, Chris Marlowe, Gogol, Orson Welles, Waylon Jennings. Anything that smudges the border between literary and speculative fiction.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
Nope…But seriously, I don’t write with a message in mind. I feel the author, in many cases, in the best cases, is as much an observer as the reader. And can have as valid an interpretation as any reader.

You can find out more about Eric at ericlahti.com and at his blog.
You can also follow him on Twitter and Facebook.

“Security System” – Halloween 2018

Eric Lahti is a programmer, author, martial artist, and generally decent guy. He writes urban fantasy with a smattering of horror and humor with the odd short story tossed in. He’s the author of the Henchmen series and his ode to Kung Fu Theater: Greetings From Sunny Aluna. His most recent book about devils, ghost hunters, witches, and magic should be available sometime this Fall.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I enjoy stories that make me wonder and sticks with me long after the story is over. I’m not particular to any genre, but I love stories that cover big stuff. Be it Sci-Fi, urban fantasy, or anything else, as long as it leaves something behind, I dig it.

Who are your favorite authors?
I love Richard Matheson’s work.  Tim Powers has done some absolutely amazing work, too. Heinlein, Asimov, Stephenson, Walter Gibson, Lester Dent, Stephen King, Harlan Ellison, Walter Jon Williams.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
Not overly. Some of my books are a reaction to what I see going on in the world, others just have larger themes. They all have the same underlying sense of something magical happening just around the corner. Maybe that’s the message: Keep looking and you might find something amazing.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
Definitely Tim Powers. I love his work and the intricacy that he weaves into his plots.  Some of the bigger names of the 30s pulp world such as Walter Gibson and Lester Dent have also influenced me. Their love of adventure shines through their works.

Lea, Trisha

You can find out more about Trisha on her website; and can follow her on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

“The Wolf’s Bane” – Winter Digest 2018

Trisha Lea fell in love with writing at eight-years-old and has been honing her craft ever since. She studied theater at the American Musical and Dramatic Academy and has since returned to her first passion. She recently finished her first novel and Tweets daily flash fictions. She lives in Colorado with her husband, two kids, and two cats.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I like suspenseful, dark and gritty, and weird stories.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
My favorite books are “The Library at Mount Char,” by Scott Hawkins, “The Bone Clocks,” by David Mitchell, and the Dark Tower Series by Stephen King. Since I’ve spent a lot of time in those worlds, they have dramatically influenced my writing style.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
Most people are afraid of monsters, ghosts, or the dark. I’m more afraid of other people and what they are capable of doing. I want my readers to question their ideas of good and evil, and find that maybe everyone has a little bit of both.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
I love speculative fiction because it asks the question “What if?” Anything is possible, and if we can dream it, we can create it.

You can find out more about Arthur at arthurmacabe.com, and you can find him on Twitter.

“The Schlikt” – Halloween 2018

Arthur Macabe is a writer of science fiction, horror, fantasy and the strange. In addition to his writing projects, he conducts weekly interviews with other writers, inspiring others in the pursuit of the craft and discovering new stories.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I love stories which make me think and take me to and fun and unexpected place.

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I love to write science fiction and fantasy, as well as non-fiction about engineering and construction practices.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
The Sword of Shannara was one of the first books I read. That feeling I had when I finished the book is the same feeling I hope my readers discover when they read my work.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
There can be a sense of adventure no matter where you are. I also strive for a positive twist in my stories, the primary character discovering a new sense of freedom.

David Mcalister

You can find out more about David at his website, and can follow him on Twitter.

“The Teacup” – Nov/Dec 2018

David McAllister is a UK based writer and blogger with a love for stories that challenge our beliefs about the world. He loves to craft fiction that ask questions about where the human race are headed and what waits on the other side. He lives with his wife and four children so quite frankly its a miracle he finds time to write at all.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
Challenging, mind bending and thought provoking fiction. Parallel worlds, technology gone awry and the human race having to re-evaluate their very existence.

Who are your favorite authors?
Stephen King is the master storyteller for me. I don’t think I would be a writer without his influence. Asimov, Heinlein and Phillip K. Dick are probably more indicative of my own writing style.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
I want to people to place themselves in my stories and make them question what it means to be human. I like to offer a form of escape in a world fast falling apart.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
Technology is playing an increasingly important role in our way of life. Its becoming harder to separate the human and the computer element. Speculative fiction is very close to home now and may well be science fact rather than science fiction in the next 50 years.

Find Richard at his website,
or follow him on Twitter.

“Shimmering in the Night” – Sep/Oct 2018
“Shadow Men” – Halloween 2018

Richard D Mellinger, Jr. was born and raised in Monterey, Ca. He has a BS and MS in Physics from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and San Diego State, respectively. He writes fiction of all sorts and loves physics, astronomy, writing, photography, and dogs… mostly dogs… all the dogs.

Who are your favorite authors?
Kurt Vonnegut, Christopher Moore, and Stephen King

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
I don’t think there are many limits on the things I enjoy writing about. I just write whatever strikes my fancy. Sometimes it’s science fiction or fantasy. Other times it’s horror or literary. If you find a pattern, please let me know!


What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
The little voice inside my head that tells me what to write is a weird love child of all my favorite authors. Though, having read so much Kurt Vonnegut, Christopher Moore, and Stephen King, they tend to be the dominant ingredients.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
I like the freedom to explore and play in a world where I make the rules.

Mitchell

You can find out more about Michael at his website, and follow him on Twitter and Instagram.
You can also find his music at Reverbnation!

“The Circle’s Child” – Winter Digest 2018

Michael Mitchell, Jr. is a writer, illustrator, and musician living in beautiful Richmond, Virginia. He has been exploring imaginative worlds and developing characters for most of his life, and his passion for storytelling drives every aspect of his art and writing. Michael also enjoys reading, playing tabletop & video games, watching movies, and collecting way too many things.

What are your favorite kinds of stories to read?
I’ve always loved fantasy stories. It started with the Chronicles of Narnia, but I remember really getting hooked on the genre when I discovered L. Frank Baum’s The Tin Woodman of Oz at my elementary school library. I’m a fan of stories full of strange creatures, talking animals, magical items, heroic characters, and epic quests and journeys.

Who are your favorite authors?
Some of my favorite authors include John Steinbeck, C.S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, L. Frank Baum, Carl Barks, David Eddings, J.K. Rowling, Scott Snyder, and Kate DiCamillo.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
It’s not a book, but the original Star Wars trilogy had a huge impact on the formation of my imagination and storytelling. C.S. Lewis’s Narnia series introduced me to worldbuilding, allegory, wonder, and of course talking animals.
My mom Sharyn was also an amazing artist (writer & painter) with an incredible imagination and a gift for storytelling. One of my earliest memories was the two of us crafting a miniature zoo together (with cardboard, construction paper, and plastic animals). Our awesome menagerie filled the kitchen table! She always encouraged me to pursue the arts and to keep writing, imagining, and creating.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
I tend to gravitate toward the topics and themes of transformation, identity, mystery, hope, and the hero’s journey.

Find out more about Dennis at dennismombauer.com.
You can also follow Dennis on Twitter and Facebook.
Find “Die Novelle” HERE.

“A Passage of Time” – Sep/Oct 2018
“Below the Cubicle Sea” – Nov/Dec 2018

Dennis Mombauer, *1984, currently lives in Colombo as a freelance writer of fiction, textual experiments, reviews; and essays on climate change and education.  He also is co-publisher of “Die Novelle–Magazine for Experimentalism”. He has publications in various magazines and anthologies. He published the German novel “Das Maskenhandwerk” (The Mask Trade) with AAVAA press in 2017.

 

Other than what we see here, what else do you enjoy writing about?
Very often, my protagonists have crumbling palaces or networks of caverns snaking through their minds, and these places are not always empty. The other theme of my writing is cities, with an interest in their social workings and different strata, in how they function as human colonies and engines of progress.

What books and/or authors would you count among your primary influences?
The usual suspects, from classics to genre literature. Some huge influences that may be lesser known: Daniel Ableev (my former colleague and an eminent strangeologist, always pushing the boundaries in all directions), Hugh Cook, Mark Z. Danielewski, Thomas Ligotti (the Lovecraft of our time), Jeff Long, Clark Ashton Smith, and Cordwainer Smith.

Do you have an overall message you wish to convey with your work?
For me, writing expresses what I cannot put into words otherwise, and what I might not even be consciously aware of. I would say that there are many different ways to look at the same thing, everybody gets lost, and what is important is to question yourself and try to be better.

What is it about speculative fiction that draws your interest?
To view the world from a different perspective and to show how things could change. Naturalist fiction often ends up reinforcing the belief that the present state is without alternative. I find it important to have a layer of alienation from reality, a veil of dissociation, a filter through which to view the things that really matter.

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